Cybersecurity Firm Warns That Hackers Can Take Control of Cars

From “Cybersecurity Firm Warns That Hackers Can Take Control of Cars”
Wall Street Journal (04/13/17) Dawson, Chester. Reprinted by ASIS International.

An Israeli cybersecurity firm is raising fresh concerns about hackers taking control of moving cars, remotely shutting down an engine with the help of a smartphone app, a Bluetooth connection, and a type of device commonly plugged into ports located under vehicle dashboards. On 13 April, Argus Cyber Security Ltd. said it was able to use a so-called dongle, a device often installed by insurance companies to monitor driving patterns or by owners wanting in-vehicle Wi-Fi, to crack into a vehicle’s internal communication system. The firm triggered a signal meant to disable the fuel pump, something that normally would happen only after a collision. Argus didn’t disclose the model of car it hacked, but the breach is the latest in a series of high-profile hacks, including an incident two years ago staged by two security researchers who controlled a Jeep Cherokee via a wireless internet connection.

The Intruder in the Brigham OR – How Did She Get There?

From “The Intruder in the Brigham OR – How Did She Get There?”
Boston Globe (02/05/17) Kowalczyk, Liz. Re-posted by ASIS.

A former surgical resident impersonated a physician and gained access to restricted areas to observe operations and attend patient rounds at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. Cheryl Wang, previously dismissed from a residency program in New York City, wandered into operating rooms in official Brigham scrubs she may have obtained from a previous visit. Although Brigham staff are required to scan their identification badges to enter operation rooms, Wang slipped into the surgical suites by walking in behind other employees who were holding the door open for each other. Following the security breach, the hospital says it has strengthened its policy for allowing observers into its operating rooms. Physicians now are required to verify that a doctor-in-training is in good standing with his or her educational institution. The hospital also plans to educate staff about the dangers of “tailgating,” or letting people follow staff into restricted areas without scanning an ID card. Electronic card access and surveillance cameras are considered security best practices, but hospital security experts are considering other safeguards, including turnstiles, security officers, and biometric systems.

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Our new Blog starts Spring 2016

This Spring we will begin sharing important security news, home security product reviews, videos geared toward safety education, and some really simple ways to keep yourself and your property safe.

Here’s a taste:
Do you want to avoid gas pump credit card “skimmers” but still get your credit card points?  There’s an easy solution!  Use your credit card to buy gas station gift cards and refill on-line.  Use the gift cards at the pump.  
 
You got your points and your credit cards are safer!
 
Can’t wait to see you in April!