Cybersecurity Firm Warns That Hackers Can Take Control of Cars

From “Cybersecurity Firm Warns That Hackers Can Take Control of Cars”
Wall Street Journal (04/13/17) Dawson, Chester. Reprinted by ASIS International.

An Israeli cybersecurity firm is raising fresh concerns about hackers taking control of moving cars, remotely shutting down an engine with the help of a smartphone app, a Bluetooth connection, and a type of device commonly plugged into ports located under vehicle dashboards. On 13 April, Argus Cyber Security Ltd. said it was able to use a so-called dongle, a device often installed by insurance companies to monitor driving patterns or by owners wanting in-vehicle Wi-Fi, to crack into a vehicle’s internal communication system. The firm triggered a signal meant to disable the fuel pump, something that normally would happen only after a collision. Argus didn’t disclose the model of car it hacked, but the breach is the latest in a series of high-profile hacks, including an incident two years ago staged by two security researchers who controlled a Jeep Cherokee via a wireless internet connection.

Author: Gregory Schmidt, PSP, CHPA-I

Gregory M. Schmidt, CPP, PSP, CHSS of Eagle/ Trident Security is board certified in Security Management, Physical Security, and Healthcare Security supervision. He has over thirty years of experience developing dynamic security programs, plans and policies for businesses in Indiana, Kansas and Florida. His conversation-style personal safety seminars are highly regarded and always in demand. Mr. Schmidt is a member of ASIS International, the International Association for Healthcare Security & Safety and the American Society for Healthcare Engineering.