Designing a School to Stop Shooters

From “Designing a School to Stop Shooters”
The Wall Street Journal (03/13/18) Hobbs, Tawnell D.  Posted by ASIS.

The Wylie Independent School District spent $19 million to make George W. Bush Elementary School in an upper-class Dallas suburban neighborhood able to withstand a school shooter. The special features include sparse landscaping and numerous windows in the front to provide a clear view of approaching visitors. In addition, entering the school is a multistep process. First, visitors enter a vestibule and must be buzzed inside the main office. Then, a government-issued ID must be scanned through a system called the “Raptor,” which flags child molesters and anyone else who should be kept out. The school has wide hallways and no small nooks, making it harder to hide or avoid video surveillance that is viewable by school administrators and police officers in patrol cars. The Wylie School District has regular lockdown and emergency drills, full-time security officers trained in active school shooting situations, and strong ties with local police, according to district spokesman Ian Halperin. These types of designs and tactics are becoming more common among the country’s 98,000 public schools as students, parents, administrators, and lawmakers grapple with the rash of school shootings. Since 1990, there have been 32 shootings in schools where at least three people were killed or injured.

Author: Gregory Schmidt, CPP, PSP, CHSS

Gregory M. Schmidt, CPP, PSP, CHSS of Eagle/ Trident Security is board certified in Security Management, Physical Security, and Healthcare Security supervision. He has over thirty years of experience developing dynamic security programs, plans and policies for businesses in Indiana, Kansas and Florida. His conversation-style personal safety seminars are highly regarded and always in demand. Mr. Schmidt is a member of ASIS International, the International Association for Healthcare Security & Safety and the American Society for Healthcare Engineering.